The Philippines to change the color of the 100-piso note

The Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP: the Central Bank of the Philippines) has plans to change the appearance of the 100-piso bill because there were complaints about the color which makes it look too much like the 1,000-piso bill, especially in the dark. The new 100-piso note will get a different shade of bluish-grey, instead of the current mauve (that's #E0B0FF for all you HEX-fans out there).

The first notes with the new color are expected to be released in January 2016. Below a picture which shows the two current notes together.

© www.banknotenews.com
© www.banknotenews.com

Steven Wednesday 28 October 2015 at 10:57 am | | news | No comments
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New record set for Dutch banknote

At a recent auction in Zürich, Switzerland, a record was set for the most expensive banknote from The Netherlands in history, as Coinweek reports. Being Dutch myself, this of course is fascinating to me. Previously the most expensive banknote was a 200-gulden note from 1860 which sold for €44,280 in 2013.

The new record holder is a 100-gulden note from 1914 which has skyrocketed to $96,325 (about €87,357). The buyer was Amsterdam dealer Theo Peters, who said he was "pleased with the note and of its quality". Some interesting history on the note, from Coinweek:

Patrick Plomp, dealer, researcher and author of the Catalog of Netherlands Paper Money, 1573–2002 (2014, www.patrickp.nl), knows of only two other examples, both in the collection of De Nederlandse Bank, the Dutch central bank. One is a specimen issue with serial number 00000, the other a perforated canceled note with number 75204, making the Sincona piece the only known example not turned in and destroyed.

Het Nederlandse Bankbiljet 1814-2002 vormgeving en ontwikkeling (“The Dutch Banknote 1814-2002 Design and Development”), second edition by J. Bolten, P.J. Soetens, J.J. Grolle, and P. Koeze, sheds light on this rare and important piece of financial history for Netherlands. It was an emergency note issued on Aug. 4, 1914, designed and printed by Joh. Enschedé en Zonen in Haarlem, the security printing firm that still prints euro bank notes for Netherlands today. The archives of the Dutch National Bank report a production of 100,000 pieces with series NB, and 50,000 with series NC notes. The 1,000-gulden note was also produced and issued, but records show all were accounted for when they were taken out of circulation and canceled on March 27, 1923. Also, 300- and 200-gulden notes were created but not issued.

The 100-gulden note was revoked by royal decision 43, dated May 10, 1928, and the official recall notice was issued on May 29, 1928. The actual out-of-circulation date was May 25, 1929, after which it was no longer possible to convert it to new money. On May 30, 1939, 10 notes were still outstanding. As they were not returned, they were written off the books and their value added to the profit of the central bank.

© www.coinweek.com

Steven Monday 26 October 2015 at 11:24 am | | news | No comments

Rwanda issues redesigned 1,000-francs banknote

The National Bank of Rwanda has issued a new banknote of 1,000 francs. The new note looks pretty much the same as the current version accept for improved security and the absence of any french words. The only two languages on the note are english and kinyarwanda which is interesting because to my knowledge french is still the third official language of Rwanda.

The characteristics of the new note as described in the official announcement (pdf-alert!):

Size: 140 mm x 72 mm
Watermark: Coat of arms of the Republic of Rwanda and an electrotype representing the logo "BNR" below it
Dominant Colour: Blue

1. Front
a) Wording
- "BANKI NKURU Y'U RWANDA" printed on the upper part;
- "AMAFARANGA IGIHUMBI" printed in the lower part;
- "Iyi noti yemewe n'amategeko" printed below the words "BANKI NKURU Y'U RWANDA"
b) Other characteristics
- The Principal design: The National Museum of Rwanda
- The face value of the note is written horizontally in each corner except on the upper right corner;
- The transparent image of the number "1000" below words "IYI NOTI YEMEWE N'AMATEGEKO" depending on the disposition of the note;
- The date of issue between the Governor's signature and Vice Governor's signature;
- Serial number of the note printed horizontally in black color in the upper right corner and vertically on the left side;
- A hexagonal picture with an image of a flying dove inside shifting to words "BNR" depending on the disposition of the note;
- On the front of one thousand francs banknote, there is an image of a flying dove changing colour from dark green to blue depending on position from green to blue and a bright ring seen on a circular movement;
- The invisible fibres scattered on each side of the note fluorescent under ultraviolet light;
- The date of issue of the note: 01.05.2015.

2. Back
a) Wording
- "NATIONAL BANK OF RWANDA" printed on the upper part;
- "THIS NOTE IS LEGAL TENDER" printed under the words "NATIONAL BANK OF RWANDA"
- "ONE THOUSAND FRANCS" printed just under the words "THIS NOTE IS LEGAL TENDER"

b) Other characteristics
- Golden monkey in the Volcano National Park;
- The face value of the note written horizontally in all corners of the banknote;
- The transparent image on the note in upper right composed by reversed number of "1000" depending on the disposition of the note
- A windowed security thread in which the micro text reads "BNR" and the number "1000" changes colour red to green, located on the left side of the note.

from: www.banknotenews.com
from: www.banknotenews.com

Steven Friday 23 October 2015 at 09:52 am | | news | No comments
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Argentina shows design of the new 20-peso note

The Sociedad de Estado Casa de Moneda de la Nacion has announced the design of the new Argentinian 20-peso note. The banknotes in Argentina are currently being redesigned and we already have seen the new 5- and 10-peso notes. Below are two pictures of the front and back of the new note. The front is from MRI Bankers' guide and the back is a still from the video at the bottom.

I'm pretty excited about the back of the new 20-peso note because even in this low quality image taken from the video it still looks amazing!

© www.mriguide.com

Steven Wednesday 21 October 2015 at 09:07 am | | news | Three comments
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Funny proposals for new Australian banknotes

Say what you will about Australia but they can play one hell of a game of rugby and they like to have some fun. And when it comes to fun their banknotes are no exception. Last week a petition started to change the denomination of the current Australian dollar to 'dollarydoos', which is a reference to the Simpsons cartoon. Right now almost 50,000 people have signed the petition. While it will never happen, it sure sounds great!

Another Australian artist has taken a much more serious approach to a new series of banknotes. Well, serious, more professional is perhaps a better word. Unsatisfied with the people represented on the current banknotes (because who knows who they are anymore?) Melbourne artist Aaron Tyler decided to design some new banknotes with images and faces every Australian who lives right now will recognize. So the whole set has become a interesting who's-who for 'Straylian' (pop)culture. Steve Irwin and Dame Edna on a banknote: brilliant!





Steven Monday 19 October 2015 at 10:16 am | | news | No comments
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Nicaragua to issues new series of banknotes

The Banco Central de Nicaragua has announced that from 26 October 2015 a new series of banknotes will be issued to the public. The denominations of 10-, 20-, 50-, 100- and 200-córdobas will be printed on polymer. The 500-córdobas note will be printed on a cotton paper substrate. The existing notes will circulate together with the new notes and will gradually be replaced.

I'm curious what the new notes will look like in real life because the images look pretty nice! I especially like the way they have incorporated the see-through panel in the themes on the different notes. The images below are from banknotenews.com.






Steven Wednesday 14 October 2015 at 12:02 pm | | news | No comments
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Bank of Scotland unveils first plastic banknote

The Bank of Scotland has unveiled its first polymer note today. This is a special (very) limited edition of just 50 notes which will be put up for auction in December at Spink's. The proceeds will go to BBC Children in Need. The notes feature an image of the charity’s mascot Pudsey Bear, made by then 12-year old Kayla Robson. The first 40 notes will have serial numbers beginning with PUDSEY01 to PUDSEY40. The remaining 10 banknotes will be available for personalised serial numbers, such as initials and date of birth.

At the end of the year the design for the new circulating 5-pound note will be unveiled (which will be similar to the current paper note) while the issue date will be the second half of 2016. The new note will be 125 x 66 mm in size, slightly smaller than the current 135 x 70 mm 5-pound note. It won't be until 2017 when we see the new 10-pound printed on polymer. 

The current paper 5- an 10-pound notes will be gradually withdrawn from circulation.

© Bank of Scotland

Steven Thursday 08 October 2015 at 10:19 am | | news | No comments
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Namibia to change the 10- and 20-dollar notes

The Central Bank of Namibia has announced that 10- and 20-namibia dollars with a modified design will be issued from 20 October 2015, according to The Namibian.

Making the announcement in Windhoek yesterday, Bank of Namibia's director of strategic communications and financial sector development Ndangi Katoma said the new bank notes will not have the diamond shape security feature which appears on the 2012 series and the improved 2013 versions.
He said the removal of the security feature is in line with the bank's philosophy of continuous improvement and cost effectiveness through regular reviews of currency production.
Katoma said the other three security features - the water mark, the (relief) raised print and the security thread - will remain on the new notes.
The existing N$10 and N$20 notes will still remain in circulation with the new notes.
“We realised that we have too many security features on those low value notes,” Katoma said, adding that removing the diamond security feature saves the central bank money without compromising the security of the notes. - See more at: http://www.namibian.com.na/indexx.php?id=32488&page_type=story_detail&category_id=1#sthash.3qhIFQxl.dpuf
Making the announcement in Windhoek yesterday, Bank of Namibia's director of strategic communications and financial sector development Ndangi Katoma said the new bank notes will not have the diamond shape security feature which appears on the 2012 series and the improved 2013 versions.
He said the removal of the security feature is in line with the bank's philosophy of continuous improvement and cost effectiveness through regular reviews of currency production.
Katoma said the other three security features - the water mark, the (relief) raised print and the security thread - will remain on the new notes.
The existing N$10 and N$20 notes will still remain in circulation with the new notes.
“We realised that we have too many security features on those low value notes,” Katoma said, adding that removing the diamond security feature saves the central bank money without compromising the security of the notes. - See more at: http://www.namibian.com.na/indexx.php?id=32488&page_type=story_detail&category_id=1#sthash.3qhIFQxl.dpuf

Making the announcement in Windhoek yesterday, Bank of Namibia's director of strategic communications and financial sector development Ndangi Katoma said the new bank notes will not have the diamond shape security feature which appears on the 2012 series and the improved 2013 versions.

He said the removal of the security feature is in line with the bank's philosophy of continuous improvement and cost effectiveness through regular reviews of currency production. Katoma said the other three security features - the water mark, the (relief) raised print and the security thread - will remain on the new notes. The existing N$10 and N$20 notes will still remain in circulation with the new notes.

“We realised that we have too many security features on those low value notes,” Katoma said, adding that removing the diamond security feature saves the central bank money without compromising the security of the notes.

Update 9-10-2015: the image below shows the differences between the old and new notes.

© Central Bank of Namibia

Update 21-10-2015: here is a picture of the new 10-dollar note. It looks... naked.

© www.banknotenews.com
© www.banknotenews.com

Update 23-10-2015: and here's the 20-dollar note.

© www.banknotenews.com
© www.banknotenews.com

Steven Wednesday 07 October 2015 at 1:46 pm | | news | No comments
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Hungary announces new 20,000-forint note

The Central Bank of Hungary is busy replacing all its banknotes. Last year we saw the new 10,000-forint note and now the Bank has announced it will replace its highest denomination, the 20,000-forint note, in December 2015.

Coinworld reports: "The note will keep its predecessor’s 154- by 70-millimeter size and the basic design that was first issued in 2001 with a 1999 date. The most obvious difference in the new note is a change in its central color to a greenish-blue from a reddish-gray. 

The portrait of legendary 19th century statesman Ferenc Deák (1803 to 1876) will remain on the face side, as will the old House of Commons in Pest on the back. Deák, known as the “Sage of Hungary,” was a leading fighter for improvement in the conditions of the Hungarian peasantry, and the architect of the Compromise of 1867 that led to union between Austria and Hungary under Emperor Franz Joseph."

"The notes have had the usual panoply of modern security features ever since their inception: Intaglio and microprinting, security thread and fibers, a see-through register, ultraviolet features, fluorescence, optically variable ink, and holographic foil. An addition for 2015 is iridescent printing."

"The new note will be put into circulation in mid-December, at which time the bank will offer specimen and low-numbered notes for sale."

"This is the second of the current series of Hungarian bank notes to be revised. A new 10,000-forint note was introduced last year. It is expected that the 500-, 1,000-, 2,000-, and 5,000-forint denominations will be replaced by 2018."

"Hungary’s bank note paper is made from cotton and is manufactured by Diósgyor Paper Mill Ltd. Notes are printed by the Hungarian Banknote Printing Shareholding Company and designed by Károly Vagyóczky."

Steven Friday 02 October 2015 at 09:39 am | | news | No comments
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Sweden has issued its first 4 new banknotes

The Sveriges Riksbank has issued the first four new banknotes of the new banknote series. The 20-, 50-, 200- and 1,000-krona banknotes have been issued on 1 October 2015. The 100- and 500-krona banknotes will become legal tender on 1 October 2016. 

The following themes and portraits have been used for the first new notes:

Update 23-10-2015: on this site you can admire some of the designs that didn't make it.




Steven Friday 02 October 2015 at 09:30 am | | news | No comments
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